Haitian Studies Association

Board and Advisory Council

2020 Board of Directors

Mark Schuller

President

Mark Schuller is Associate Professor of Anthropology and NGO Leadership and Development at Northern Illinois University and affiliate at the Faculté d’Ethnologie, l’Université d’État d’Haïti. Supported by the National Science Foundation Senior and CAREER Grant, Bellagio Center, and others, Schuller’s research on NGOs, globalization, disasters, and gender in Haiti has been published in over thirty book chapters and peer-reviewed articles as well as public media, including a column in Huffington Post. He is the author of two monographs, including Humanitarian Aftershocks in Haiti (Rutgers, 2016) and co-editor of five volumes, including Tectonic Shifts: Haiti since the Earthquake (Kumarian Press, 2012). He is co-director / co-producer of documentary Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (2009). Schuller is co-editor of Berghahn Books’ Catastrophes in Context: a Series in Engaged Social Science on Disasters and University of Alabama Press’ NGOgraphies: a Series of Ethnographic Reflections of NGOs. Recipient of the Margaret Mead Award, he is board chair of the Lambi Fund of Haiti and active in several solidarity efforts.

Regine Jackson

Vice President

Cécile Accilien

Board Member
Cécile Accilien is Interim chair and Associate Professor in the Department of African and African-American Studies and Affiliate faculty in the “Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Department” ; she is also the associate director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) as well as the director of the Institute of Haitian Studies (IHS) at the University of Kansas. Her area of studies are Francophone African and Caribbean Literatures and Cultures and Film & Media Studies; Her primary research areas are Caribbean Popular Cultures, Film and Media Studies, Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies. She is the author of Rethinking Marriage in Francophone African and Caribbean Literatures (Lexington Books, 2008). She has also co-edited and contributed to two collections of essays, Revolutionary Freedoms: A History of Survival, Strength and Imagination in Haiti (Caribbean Studies Press, 2006) and Just Below South: Intercultural Performance in the Caribbean and the U.S. South (University of Virginia Press, 2007); she co-wrote English-Haitian Creole Phrasebook (McGraw Hill, 2010) and Francophone Cultures Through Film (Focus Publishing, 2013). She has published articles in the Journal of Haitian Studies, Women, Gender and Families of Color, Revue française, Southern Quarterly and Diaspora in Caribbean Art. She is currently working on a co-edited volume Teaching Haiti from Transdisciplinary Studies and a monograph temporarily titled Haitian Hollywood: Representing Haiti and the Haitian Diaspora in Popular Cinema. In 2019, she became the chair of the Editorial Board of the journal Women, Gender and Families of Color.

Nadege T Clitandre

Board Member

Marlene Daut

Board Member
Marlene L. Daut specializes in pre-20th-century Caribbean, African American, and French colonial literary and historical studies. Her first book, Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865, was published in 2015 by Liverpool University Press’ Series in the Study of International Slavery. Her second book, Baron de Vastey and the Origins of Black Atlantic Humanism, was published in fall 2017 from Palgrave Macmillan’s series in the New Urban Atlantic. She is currently working on a collaborative project entitled, An Anthology of Haitian Revolutionary Fictions, which is forthcoming with the University of Virginia Press. Daut is the co-creator and co-editor of H-Net Commons’ digital platform, H-Haiti. She also curates a website on early Haitian print culture at http://lagazetteroyale.com and has developed an online bibliography of fictions of the Haitian Revolution from 1787 to 1900 at the website http://haitianrevolutionaryfictions.com

Regine Dupuy

Board Member

Darlene Elizabeth Dubuisson

Board Member
Darlene Dubuisson is a Ph.D. Candidate in the joint Applied Anthropology program at Columbia University. She holds a Bachelor’s in English Literature from Boston University, an M.A. in International Educational Development from Columbia University, Teachers College, and M.Phil. in Anthropology from Columbia University. Her research interests include transnationalism, migration, intellectualism, and the intergenerational transfer of knowledge. She is currently writing her dissertation on the reintegration of academic/intellectual diaspora returnees to Haiti, as well as, the new generation of Haitian university students, artists, activists, and scholars, as they try to carve new intellectual spaces and engage in the global knowledge economy through transnational collaboration, media, and technology.
Darlene has taught within the City University of New York and at the State University of Haiti. She currently works Columbia University’s Committee on Global Thought as a Project Manager and Associate Research Scholar.

Régine Jean-Charles

Board Member
Dr. Régine Michelle Jean-Charles is a feminist literary scholar and activist who has been working on issues surrounding rape culture for almost two decades. She is currently Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and African and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College. Her scholarship and teaching on world literatures in French includes work on Black France, Sub-Saharan Africa, Haiti and the Haitian diaspora. Among the classes she teaches She holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania, and an AM and PhD from Harvard University. She has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Mellon Mays Foundation, and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.
Her first book, Conflict Bodies:  The Politics of Rape Representation in the Francophone Imaginary (Columbia University Press: 2014) examines theoretical, visual, and literary texts in order to challenge the dominant views of sexual violence. She has authored over 30 publications that have appeared in books, edited volumes, and peer-reviewed journals including American Quarterly, Small Axe, Journal of Haitian Studies, French Forum, and Research in African Literatures. Her current book explores feminist ethics in contemporary Haitian literature.
Much of Dr. Jean-Charles’s activist work has been with A Long Walk Home, where she began as founding board member in 2003. A Long Walk Home, Inc., is a non-profit organization that empowers young artists and activists to end violence against all girls and women. Her involvement in ALWH ranged from performing in Story of a Rape Survivor, a multi-media arts performance about black women and sexual assault, conducting workshops for the Girl/Friends Leadership Institute in Chicago, to giving lectures at universities across the country on topics such as study abroad and sexual assault. Dr. Jean-Charles is also a member of the Shatter the Silence initiative which works with faith communities in Boston to end gender- based violence.
Dr. Jean-Charles is also a regular contributor to media outlets like WGBH and Cognoscenti, where she has weighed in on topics ranging from #metoo to issues affecting the Haitian diaspora.

Celucien L. Joseph

Board Member
Celucien L. Joseph is an interdisciplinary scholar, researcher, and educator with a liberative intent. He is an associate professor of English at Indian River State College. He Holds a PhD in Literary Studies from the University of Texas at Dallas and a PhD in Theology and Ethics from the University of Pretoria (Pretoria, South Africa). He is the author of numerous academic books and peer-reviewed articles. His publications include Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edwidge Danticat (2019), Between Two Worlds: Jean Price-Mars, Haiti, and Africa (2018), Vodou in the Haitian Experience: A Black Atlantic Perspective (2018), and Thinking in Public: Faith, Secular Humanism, and Development in Jacques Roumain (2017). His books From Toussaint to Price-Mars: Rhetoric, Race, and Religion in Haitian Thought (2013), and Haitian Modernity and Liberative Interruptions: Discourse on Race, Religion, and Freedom (2013) received Honorable Mention at The Pan African International 2014 Book Awards. He is a member of the editorial board of Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies. Dr. Joseph is the founder of Hope Academy de Bois d’eau, a school for impoverished families located in Port-Margot, Haiti.

Mario LaMothe

Board Member
Mario LaMothe is an Assistant Professor of Black Studies and Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, a member of UIC’s Diaspora Studies Cluster and a faculty affiliate of its Gender and Women’s Studies and Museum and Exhibition Studies programs. He received a doctorate in Performance Studies from Northwestern University. Most recently, Mario was a doctoral fellow at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences po – Paris), and a postdoctoral associate at the African-American Cultural Center at UIC and Duke University’s Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. His research agenda involves embodied pedagogies of arts and expressive cultures in Haiti, and the intersections of spectatorship, queerness and social justice in Black Hemispheric American locations. He is a published author, performance artist, and LGBTQI rights advocate in Haiti. https://aast.uic.edu/profiles/lamothe-mario/

Lamour Sabine

Board Member

Jean Eddy Saint Paul

Board Member

Hadassah St. Hubert

Board Member
Hadassah St. Hubert, Ph.D. is currently the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Latin American and Caribbean Studies with the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC ) at Florida International University. She received Ph.D. in History from the University of Miami and her dissertation, Visions of a Modern Nation: Haiti at the World’s fairs, focuses on Haiti's participation in World’s Fairs and Expositions in the twentieth century. Dr. St. Hubert served as the Assistant Editor for Haiti: An Island Luminous, a digital humanities site dedicated entirely to Haitian history and Haitian studies. An Island Luminous pairs books, manuscripts, newspapers, and photos digitized by libraries and archives in Haiti and the United States with commentary by more than 100 authors at 75 universities around the world. As a Postdoctoral Fellow with dLOC, she leads programming and digitization efforts in collaboration with dLOC’s partners, such as Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator (DVCAI) and L’Institut de Sauvegarde du Patrimoine National (ISPAN) in Haiti.

Andrew Tarter

Board Member
Andrew Tarter was born and raised in Haiti. He holds a Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology from the University of Florida. Dr. Tarter is an interdisciplinary social scientist whose research, consulting, and applied work in Haiti have been supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the Fulbright Program, the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, and the Government of Haiti. Dr. Tarter is currently a Science and Technology Policy Fellow supported by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, with a placement in the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government; his work in the Global Development Lab of USAID focuses on ensuring social inclusion and gender integration in science, technology, innovation, and private sector partnerships in international development.

Executive Director

Claudine Michel

Executive Director

Claudine Michel served for many years as Director of the Center for Black Studies Research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she is currently Professor of Black Studies and Assistant Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs. She received a BA in education from the École Normale Supérieure; studied at the Faculté d’Ethnologie, Université d’État d’Haïti; and earned a PhD in international education from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research has appeared in many scholarly venues and she is the author and co-editor of a number of volumes on education, Black studies, and Haitian Vodou. Her current work re-conceptualizes alternative modes of knowledge production and models of pedagogical interventions grounded in both education and religion. She is a former president of the Haitian Studies Association and the long-time editor of the only peer-reviewed journal on Haiti, The Journal of Haitian Studies, published by the UCSB Center for Black Studies Research for the Haitian Studies Association. Dr. Michel is founding member of KOSANBA, A Scholarly Association for the Studies of Haitian Vodou and Culture and a founding editor of Kalfou, A Journal of Comparative Ethnic and Relational Studies, both housed at the UCSB Center for Black Studies Research. After the 2010 earthquake, she served as consultant for Direct Relief International on its Haiti community projects and is a member of the Haiti Soleil Board of Directors. Recent awards include an excellence and service award from the Haitian Studies Association and the prestigious Jean-Price Mars Medal from the Faculté d’Ethnologie, Université d’État d’Haïti.

Past Executive Director

Marc Prou

Past Executive Director

Marc Prou, associate professor and former chair of the Africana Studies Department, is currently the director of the Haitian Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston. His teaching and research address New World slaves societies, Caribbean social and cultural history, Caribbean literatures, Urban Education and Kreyòl linguistics. Through his interdisciplinary pedagogy, he has developed and led various study abroad programs to Haiti, Jamaica and Cuba. The author of numerous books, and peer-reviewed articles, essay reviews, and book chapters, including Introduction to Africana Studies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives of the African Experience (2013); “Haiti’s Condemnation: History and Culture at the Crossroads,” in Latin American Research Review (2005); “Attempts at Reforms: Mending the Tapestry of Haiti’s Education System, 1979-2004” in Journal of Haitian Studies (2009). Professor Marc Prou is a prominent Haitianist scholar activist and a keen public intellectual. He has cast a wide net of influence across generations with a variety of publications, combined with frequent public appearances in both academic and non academic circles, advancing Haitian history, language and cultural studies. Professor Prou is a co-founder of the Haitian Studies Association (HSA), he continues to relentlessly push the envelope of Haitian Studies in the academic canon.

Past Presidents

Florence Sergile

Past President 2019

Josiane Hudicourt Barnes

Past-President President 2018

Josiane Hudicourt-Barnes has been a teacher, teacher trainer, administrator, and researcher in the field of bilingual education and language development. She studied psychology at the InterAmerican University of Puerto Rico in San German, Creole Linguistics at Indiana University in Bloomington, and Language Development at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in Cambridge. She is one of the founding members of the Haitian Studies Association. Her research is about the type of thinking and language skills students from diverse cultural backgrounds bring to learning situations. Her scholarly publications center on connecting classrooms work to funds of knowledge students bring from their home and culture. Her work with the Chèche Konnen Center at TERC has been published in the Harvard Educational Review, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, and several edited volumes on science discourse and assessment. In Haiti she has been a consultant on education at Fokal and the Open Society Foundation, and an advisor to Prime Minister Michele D. Pierre-Louis and to the USAID education office. She is currently and independent consultant and researcher.

Carolle Charles

Past-President 2017

Dr. Carolle Charles is an associate professor of sociology at Baruch College. As a scholar, her research and work concentrate on processes and agencies both in Haitian society and within the Haitian immigrant communities of North America. Dr. Charles’s present scholarly work focuses on three interconnected areas of research: Labor Migration and Transnational Pattern of Migrants’ Identities; the Dynamic of Race, Culture, and History; and Gender and Empowerment. Her work is contributing to the ongoing debate on feminist studies that attempts to redefine the very meaning of feminism. She is also a past president of the Caribbean Studies Association.

(Photo by Tequila Minski)

LeGrace Benson

Past-President 2016

LeGrace Benson holds an interdisciplinary PhD in visual perception, history of art and philosophy of education from Cornell University; an interdisciplinary MFA in art, philosophy, and education theory from the University of Georgia; and an AB in art and English literature from Meredith College. She also did studies in theology, comparative religion, and history of Christianity at the Episcopal Divinity School of Philadelphia’ and special courses in film production and film history in various institutions and museums. She is professor emerita from State University of New York-ESC/Center for Distance Learning. Currently she is director of the Arts of Haiti Research Project, associate editor of the Journal of Haitian Studies, and Past President of the Board of the Haitian Studies Association. Most recent publication is Arts and Religions of Haiti; How the Sun Illuminates Under Cover of Darkness

Patrick Bellegarde-Smith

Past-President 2015

Patrick Bellegarde-Smith is a professor emeritus of Africology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He obtained a PhD in international studies from The American University, and taught in that field, and later in African-American studies and women’s studies. His scholarship presently is in the areas of African and neo-African religious thought and social philosophy, with an emphasis on national and cultural identities. He has authored, edited and co-edited five books on these subjects, and a large number of articles. Some of his work has been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, and French. He is the recipient of the Medaille Jean Price-Mars, Université d’Etat d’Haiti, and of the Lifetime Achievement Award for Scholarship from the Haitian Studies Association. He is a oungan asogwe, a priest of Vodou.

François Pierre-Louis

Past-President 2014

François Pierre-Louis, PhD, is Associate Professor of Political Science at Queens College, CUNY.  His research interests include immigration, transnationalism and Haitian politics. He has worked as a community organizer in Haiti and the U.S., and served in the private cabinet of President Aristide in 1991 and as an advisor to Prime Minister Jacques Edouard Alexis in 2007-2008. He is the author of Haitians in New York City: Transnationalism and Hometown Associations. His articles have appeared in U.S. Catholics, Wadabagei, the Journal of Haitian Studies, Education and Urban Society, and the Journal of Black Studies. He is currently coordinating the Chancellor initiative to help rebuild higher education in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

Claudine Michel

Past-President 2013

Claudine Michel served for many years as Director of the Center for Black Studies Research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she is currently Professor of Black Studies and Assistant Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs. She received a BA in education from the École Normale Supérieure; studied at the Faculté d’Ethnologie, Université d’État d’Haïti; and earned a PhD in international education from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research has appeared in many scholarly venues and she is the author and co-editor of a number of volumes on education, Black studies, and Haitian Vodou. Her current work re-conceptualizes alternative modes of knowledge production and models of pedagogical interventions grounded in both education and religion. She is a former president of the Haitian Studies Association and the long-time editor of the only peer-reviewed journal on Haiti, The Journal of Haitian Studies, published by the UCSB Center for Black Studies Research for the Haitian Studies Association. Dr. Michel is founding member of KOSANBA, A Scholarly Association for the Studies of Haitian Vodou and Culture and a founding editor of Kalfou, A Journal of Comparative Ethnic and Relational Studies, both housed at the UCSB Center for Black Studies Research. After the 2010 earthquake, she served as consultant for Direct Relief International on its Haiti community projects and is a member of the Haiti Soleil Board of Directors. Recent awards include an excellence and service award from the Haitian Studies Association and the prestigious Jean-Price Mars Medal from the Faculté d’Ethnologie, Université d’État d’Haïti.

Charlene Désir

Past-President 2012

Dr. Charlene Désir received her doctorate from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She is a research professor at the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education at Nova Southeastern University. Dr. Désir’s academic interest is in the social and psychological adjustment of immigrant students in public schools, specifically school’s social curriculum, social trauma occurring in schools, and how social issues affect learning. Dr. Désir has presented various papers and presentations on the topic of immigrant students and their adjustment to the U.S. She has also published on the topic of immigrant identity and becoming a reflective researcher. In addition, she co-founded T.E.N. global, an empowerment network for Haitian women and children, was the 2012 president of the Haitian Studies Association, and was also appointed by Governor Rick Scott to serve on the Children’s Services Council in Broward County, FL. Dr. Désir has worked as a school psychologist, K-12 school counselor, school administrator in Massachusetts district schools and as an academic advisor and professor.

Matthew Smith

Past-President 2011

Dr. Matthew J. Smith is a senior lecturer in history. His main area of research is Haitian politics and society after the U.S. occupation (1915-1934) and Haitian regional migration in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. He has published several articles and book chapters on various aspects of Haitian history and politics, and the book, Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957 (UNC Press, 2009). He has been the recipient of a Fulbright scholarship for graduate studies at the University of Florida; an Andrew Mellon Visiting Professorship at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Duke University; and a Dubois-Mandela-Rodney Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Smith teaches undergraduate courses on Haitian history and U.S. history. He is a Board member of the Haitian Studies Association and is the Director the Department’s Social History Project.

Guerda Nicolas

Past-President 2009-2010

Marie Guerda Nicolas joined the EPS faculty in August, 2008. She was an associate professor at Boston College in the Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology prior to joining the EPS faculty.
As a multicultural (Haitian American) and multilingual psychologist (Spanish, French, and Haitian Creole), her research is reflective of her background and interests. Her current research centers on partnering with ethnically diverse and immigrant communities to develop culturally effective mental health interventions to combat depression, address issues of racism and racial discrimination stress, enhance the racial and ethnic identity development of children and adolescents, and promote individual, family, and community well-being.

Guitèle Nicoleau

Past-President 2008

Dr. Nicoleau currently serves as FHI 360’s Regional Education Representative for West & Central Africa, Middle East & North Africa, with responsibility for developing and implementing a regional education strategy for FHI 360. She served as the Chief of Party for the USAID/Basic Education Project in Senegal for five years. During that time, Dr. Nicoleau received high praise for her exemplary team leadership and management capabilities and for successfully building sustainability into the project’s implementation. Dr. Nicoleau received her EdD from Harvard University Graduate School of Education in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 2001.

Florence Bellande-Robertson

Past-President 2007

Florence Bellande-Robertson holds a PhD in comparative literature from the University of California, Los Angeles and is a retired university professor of languages and literature. She is a co-founder of Multicultural Women’s Presence, a publishing company dedicated to fostering women’s voices, and also co-founded Foundation Hope for Haiti, an American fundraising organization that supports essential humanitarian programs in the areas of education, health, entrepreneurship, social communications, community development, and democracy building.  She is the author of Perhaps Tomorrow (1983) and The Marassa Concept in Lilas Desquiron’s Reflexions of Loko Miwa (1999) and the co-editor of Brassage (2006), an anthology of poetry by Haitian women.

Marie José N’Zengou-Tayo

Past-President 2005-2006

Marie-José Nzengou-Tayo (PhD.) is Senior Lecturer in French at the University of the West Indies, Mona and the former Chair of the Department of Modern Languages & Literatures (2005-2011). She is specialized in the Teaching of French as a Foreign Language and a researcher in the literature and culture of the French-speaking Caribbean. In 2004 she received the French order of the Palmes académiques (Chevalier). She is a past President of the Haitian Studies Association (2005-2006), and the recipient of the 2013 Principal’s Award for Research for her article “The Haitian Short-Story: An Overview” (Journal of Caribbean Literatures, Vol. 6:3).

Kathleen M. Balutansky

Past-President 2000-2003

Carole M. Berotte Joseph

Past-President 1997-2000

Leslie Desmangles

Past-President 1990-1996

Professor Desmangles graduated from Eastern University in 1964 with a BA in music, from Palmer Seminary in Philadelphia with an M. Div. in Theology, and from Temple University in 1975 with a PhD in anthropology of religion, specializing in Caribbean and African Studies. He has taught at Ohio Wesleyan University from 1969-1976, at De Paul University from 1976-1978, and at Trinity since 1978.

A dedicated teacher, Professor Desmangles has two primary pedagogical goals: to encourage his students to understand the importance of religious beliefs in human society; and to teach them to appreciate the drama and pageantry of rituals in the religious traditions of peoples across the world. He has published widely, most notably The Faces of the Gods: Vodou and Roman Catholicism in Haiti, a Choice outstanding academic book for 1994. Moreover, he was also the associate editor for The Encyclopedia of African and African American Religions, also a Choice outstanding reference book for 2003. Professor Desmangles was honored at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association in 2007 for his scholarly contributions to the study of Caribbean religions.